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What Is The Impact Of A Theft Charge On An Individual’s Life?

An individual is going to have issues finding a job because that theft conviction is going to be a red flag in any employment interview with any company. From a business perspective, if I’m going to hire somebody who’s already been convicted of a theft, how do I know that they won’t try to take advantage of my company?

In addition to that, any kind of conviction, especially a theft, is probably going to have a negative impact on any state licensing applications that someone submits. So if the person applies for a realtor’s license, or is becoming an attorney, a nurse, a doctor, or any other profession that requires licensing or certification from the state, that application will be scrutinized and that conviction will also be scrutinized because the state has an interest in protecting its citizens.

How Would An Attorney Help Me With My Theft Charge?

The primary way they would help is with the investigation. There are things that police officers should do when they’re investigating. Sometimes they don’t. Sometimes it’s just a shoddy investigation because they think they have enough evidence or because they just don’t want to investigate the case before making an arrest. Hiring an attorney is usually going to lead to investigating the case to see where the holes are, and getting into negotiations – especially if somebody has a clean record, they can usually get them some sort of diversionary program or other alternative instead of having to face that theft conviction, if such an option is available.

If somebody has an extensive record or a few convictions here and there, then I would say it becomes even more important to hire somebody because of that. You don’t want to add on to it. You want to show a period of rehabilitation that you can present to either the state licensing board or to an employer if those issues come up, to say that you’ve changed. You’ve changed, and you’re a better person because of it, and you’re ready to move on with your life.

Do Courts Consider Someone’s Background And Go Easy On A First Time Offender?

It’s kind of a two-fold answer. Yes, the person’s background will help. However, the DA and Judge won’t necessarily go easier on someone because of it. If you’re charged with a shoplifting offense and the amount is $14, you’re a college student and no history, you’re probably going to be able to get some sort of diversion program. But, let’s say you’re the head of HR for a local company, someone who they might say should know better, and the theft was, $10,000 or $15,000 over an extended period of time.

You will be judge more harshly because of those details. Finding those issues in the reports or the investigation, the way that the officers conducted themselves, is going to play more a of a role in getting that favorable outcome for you as opposed to the college student.

Anything Else That You’d Like to Say About Theft Charges?

I did want to add that in November, California voted in a new proposition, Prop 47. A lot of people have questions about it and whether or not it applies to their case. Prop 47 essentially takes certain felony cases, whether they’re drugs or theft offenses, and makes them reducible to misdemeanors. That means that would be considered a misdemeanor for all intents and purposes. If somebody’s in prison for a theft offense that qualifies under Prop 47, then they would be released from prison and put on probation.

They would not have any of those negative effects of a felony conviction. There are some situations that don’t apply under Prop 47, but if anybody has been convicted of a theft offense and they’re curious to see if it does apply, they should definitely call the office and we can chat about that. There are certain offenses that Prop 47 doesn’t apply to, as well as certain situations that are based on the individual’s background.

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